Journal of Electronic Materials, 53, 1239-1254 (2024) DOI: doi.org/10.1007/s11664-023-10847-3

In Situ Electrical Characterization of Transient Liquid-Phase Sintered Alloys


Gilad Nave and Patrick McCluskey
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA

For more information about this article and related research, please contact Prof. Patrick McCluskey.

Abstract:

The growing demands of electrification are driving research into new electronic materials. These electronic materials must have high electrical conductivity, withstand harsh environments and high temperatures, and demonstrate reliable solutions as part of complete electronic packaging solutions. This study focuses on characterizing the manufacturing process of transient liquid-phase sintering (TLPS) of alloys in a paste form as candidates for high-temperature and high-power electronic materials. The main objective of this paper is to investigate the factors and decouple the multiple cross effects occurring during the first stage of TLPS processing in order to improve the understanding of material evolution. We conduct in situ electrical resistivity tests to directly measure material properties and analyze the dynamics and different stages of the material's evolution. We explore various factors, including alloying elements, organic binders, and heating rates, to understand their effects on the formation of electrical performance in electronic materials. More specifically, we will examine the performance of Ag-In and Ag-Sn TLPS paste systems. Additionally, we examine the packing density and changes in cross section using imaging techniques and image processing to gain insights into the early formation of the material's structural backbone. This investigation not only sheds light on the material's behavior but also has implications for robust additive manufacturing (AM) applications.

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